Monday, October 3, 2016

Forest City - A Poem

Close up shop, lock the door
Step out into the cold wind’s roar
The dark of night is where danger roams
Get in, the car is safe, he’ll take you home
Get in, the car is safe, he’ll take you home

Forest city, forest city
Hiding sin and villainy
They found themselves here, but nobody knows
Why this is the town they chose

A bike ride down the county road, two kids
One found later, who’s life’s been rid
Child must be guilty, no mercy, give him an adult’s cost
One child dead, two lives lost
One child dead, two lives lost

Forest city, forest city
Hiding sin and villainy
Many lives ruined and many lives lost
In an era of moral frost

Tissues for the family, tissues in the dead
About this peculiarity, many people read
And so came the copies, they thought they were joint
But when he returned, they knew the copycats had missed the point
But when he returned, they knew the copycats had missed the point

Forest city, forest city
Hiding sin and villainy
They hid themselves far too well
For the who they were, no one could tell

Stories high, he climbs up and through
Of this intruder’s visit, no one ever knew
Tucked into bed, warm and tight
But never wake to the morning’s light
But never wake to the morning’s light

Forest city, forest city
Hiding sin and villainy
It was a time of tragedy
Until a sudden end to the calamity


Poet’s Statement

This poem has two main sources of inspiration. The first is Gord Downie’s lyrics, especially for Wheat Kings and 38 Years Old. One of the first thing one will notice when hearing those songs is that they allude to Canadian events, in this case about law and crime. This made an immediate connection in my mind to a book I had read a while back. The book, Murder City by Michael Arntfield, covered the time period in which London City had the highest rate of homicide in Canada. With a little research to refresh my memory, I wrote this poem. Of course, writing about Canadian events isn’t the only connection to Gord Downie’s lyrics. I also stuck to a similar rhyming pattern, namely AABB, as well as repetition scheme. Though I don’t have any of the vivid imagery of Gord Downie’s lyrical works, I think this poem captures that same spirit.

4 comments:

  1. Katie I loved your poem, it made me cry. I especially loved the chorus because it took me on such a vivid journey and the storyline just added the right amount of spice.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nice poem๐Ÿ‘Œ๐Ÿผ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ

    ReplyDelete
  3. I very much enjoyed your use of repetition and imagery in the poem, it's as if i'm actually there. I also found the rhyme scheme to be very pleasing to listen to when the poem is read aloud. Over all, great job.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Your poem was amazing I could really tell that it was inspired by Gord Downie. It had such a similar rhyming pattern and theme that I almost mistook it for one of his songs. I really have no words to describe it. Amazing job

    ReplyDelete